Forum Crestin Ortodox Crestin Ortodox
 
 


Du-te înapoi   Forum Crestin Ortodox > Biserica Ortodoxa si alte religii > Alte Religii
Răspunde
 
Thread Tools Moduri de afișare
  #1  
Vechi 17.04.2015, 16:10:54
stoogecristi stoogecristi is offline
Banned
 
Data înregistrării: 15.04.2015
Locație: Bucuresti
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 52
Implicit Question: "What is Buddhism and what do Buddhists believe?"

Question: "What is Buddhism and what do Buddhists believe?"

Last edited by stoogecristi; 17.04.2015 at 16:14:59.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Vechi 17.04.2015, 16:15:52
stoogecristi stoogecristi is offline
Banned
 
Data înregistrării: 15.04.2015
Locație: Bucuresti
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 52
Implicit

Question: "What is Buddhism and what do Buddhists believe?"

Answer: Buddhism is one of the leading world religions in terms of adherents, geographical distribution, and socio-cultural influence. While largely an “Eastern” religion, it is becoming increasingly popular and influential in the Western world. It is a unique world religion in its own right, though it has much in common with Hinduism in that both teach Karma (cause-and-effect ethics), Maya (the illusory nature of the world), and Samsara (the cycle of reincarnation). Buddhists believe that the ultimate goal in life is to achieve “enlightenment” as they perceive it.

Buddhism’s founder, Siddhartha Guatama, was born into royalty in India around 600 B.C. As the story goes, he lived luxuriously, with little exposure to the outside world. His parents intended for him to be spared from the influence of religion and protected from pain and suffering. However, it was not long before his shelter was penetrated, and he had visions of an aged man, a sick man, and a corpse. His fourth vision was of a peaceful ascetic monk (one who denies luxury and comfort). Seeing the monk’s peacefulness, he decided to become an ascetic himself. He abandoned his life of wealth and affluence to pursue enlightenment through austerity. He was skilled at this sort of self-mortification and intense meditation. He was a leader among his peers. Eventually, his efforts culminated in one final gesture. He “indulged” himself with one bowl of rice and then sat beneath a fig tree (also called the Bodhi tree) to meditate till he either reached “enlightenment” or died trying. Despite his travails and temptations, by the next morning, he had achieved enlightenment. Thus, he became known as the 'enlightened one' or the 'Buddha.' He took his new realization and began to teach his fellow monks, with whom he had already gained great influence. Five of his peers became the first of his disciples.

What had Gautama discovered? Enlightenment lay in the “middle way,” not in luxurious indulgence or self-mortification. Moreover, he discovered what would become known as the ‘Four Noble Truths’—1) to live is to suffer (Dukha), 2) suffering is caused by desire (Tanha, or “attachment”), 3) one can eliminate suffering by eliminating all attachments, and 4) this is achieved by following the noble eightfold path. The “eightfold path” consists of having a right 1) view, 2) intention, 3) speech, 4) action, 5) livelihood (being a monk), 6) effort (properly direct energies), 7) mindfulness (meditation), and 8) concentration (focus). The Buddha's teachings were collected into the Tripitaka or “three baskets.”

Behind these distinguishing teachings are teachings common to Hinduism, namely reincarnation, karma, Maya, and a tendency to understand reality as being pantheistic in its orientation. Buddhism also offers an elaborate theology of deities and exalted beings. However, like Hinduism, Buddhism can be hard to pin down as to its view of God. Some streams of Buddhism could legitimately be called atheistic, while others could be called pantheistic, and still others theistic, such as Pure Land Buddhism. Classical Buddhism, however, tends to be silent on the reality of an ultimate being and is therefore considered atheistic.

Buddhism today is quite diverse. It is roughly divisible into the two broad categories of Theravada (small vessel) and Mahayana (large vessel). Theravada is the monastic form which reserves ultimate enlightenment and nirvana for monks, while Mahayana Buddhism extends this goal of enlightenment to the laity as well, that is, to non-monks. Within these categories can be found numerous branches including Tendai, Vajrayana, Nichiren, Shingon, Pure Land, Zen, and Ryobu, among others. Therefore it is important for outsiders seeking to understand Buddhism not to presume to know all the details of a particular school of Buddhism when all they have studied is classical, historic Buddhism.

The Buddha never considered himself to be a god or any type of divine being. Rather, he considered himself to be a ‘way-shower' for others. Only after his death was he exalted to god status by some of his followers, though not all of his followers viewed him that way. With Christianity however, it is stated quite clearly in the Bible that Jesus was the Son of God (Matthew 3 “And a voice from heaven said, ‘This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased’”) and that He and God are one (John 10:30). One cannot rightfully consider himself or herself a Christian without professing faith in Jesus as God.

Jesus taught that He is the way and not simply one who showed the way as John 14:6 confirms: “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except by me.” By the time Guatama died, Buddhism had become a major influence in India; three hundred years later, Buddhism had encompassed most of Asia. The scriptures and sayings attributed to the Buddha were written about four hundred years after his death.

In Buddhism, sin is largely understood to be ignorance. And, while sin is understood as “moral error,” the context in which “evil” and “good” are understood is amoral. Karma is understood as nature's balance and is not personally enforced. Nature is not moral; therefore, karma is not a moral code, and sin is not ultimately immoral. Thus, we can say, by Buddhist thought, that our error is not a moral issue since it is ultimately an impersonal mistake, not an interpersonal violation. The consequence of this understanding is devastating. For the Buddhist, sin is more akin to a misstep than a transgression against the nature of holy God. This understanding of sin does not accord with the innate moral consciousness that men stand condemned because of their sin before a holy God (Romans 1-2).

Since it holds that sin is an impersonal and fixable error, Buddhism does not agree with the doctrine of depravity, a basic doctrine of Christianity. The Bible tells us man's sin is a problem of eternal and infinite consequence. In Buddhism, there is no need for a Savior to rescue people from their damning sins. For the Christian, Jesus is the only means of rescue from eternal damnation. For the Buddhist there is only ethical living and meditative appeals to exalted beings for the hope of perhaps achieving enlightenment and ultimate Nirvana. More than likely, one will have to go through a number of reincarnations to pay off his or her vast accumulation of karmic debt. For the true followers of Buddhism, the religion is a philosophy of morality and ethics, encapsulated within a life of renunciation of the ego-self. In Buddhism, reality is impersonal and non-relational; therefore, it is not loving. Not only is God seen as illusory, but, in dissolving sin into non-moral error and by rejecting all material reality as maya (“illusion”), even we ourselves lose our “selves.” Personality itself becomes an illusion.

When asked how the world started, who/what created the universe, the Buddha is said to have kept silent because in Buddhism there is no beginning and no end. Instead, there is an endless circle of birth and death. One would have to ask what kind of Being created us to live, endure so much pain and suffering, and then die over and over again? It may cause one to contemplate, what is the point, why bother? Christians know that God sent His Son to die for us, one time, so that we do not have to suffer for an eternity. He sent His Son to give us the knowledge that we are not alone and that we are loved. Christians know there is more to life than suffering, and dying, “… but it has now been revealed through the appearing of our Savior, Christ Jesus, who has destroyed death and has brought life and immortality to light through the gospel” (2 Timothy 1:10).

Buddhism teaches that Nirvana is the highest state of being, a state of pure being, and it is achieved by means relative to the individual. Nirvana defies rational explanation and logical ordering and therefore cannot be taught, only realized. Jesus’ teaching on heaven, in contrast, was quite specific. He taught us that our physical bodies die but our souls ascend to be with Him in heaven (Mark 12:25). The Buddha taught that people do not have individual souls, for the individual self or ego is an illusion. For Buddhists there is no merciful Father in heaven who sent His Son to die for our souls, for our salvation, to provide the way for us to reach His glory. Ultimately, that is why Buddhism is to be rejected.

ˆ Copyright 2002-2015 Got Questions Ministries


Read more: http://www.gotquestions.org/Printer/...#ixzz3XZWwnVlP
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Vechi 17.04.2015, 16:17:36
stoogecristi stoogecristi is offline
Banned
 
Data înregistrării: 15.04.2015
Locație: Bucuresti
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 52
Implicit

*Matthew 3:17 "And a voice from heaven said, ‘This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased’”)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Vechi 17.04.2015, 16:44:03
stoogecristi stoogecristi is offline
Banned
 
Data înregistrării: 15.04.2015
Locație: Bucuresti
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 52
Implicit

Întrebare: Ce este budismul și ce cred budiștii?

Răspuns: Budismul este una dintre religiile principale ale lumii în ceea ce privește adepții, distribuirea geografică și influența socio-culturală. Cu toate că în mare parte este o religie „estică”, budismul devine din ce în ce mai popular și mai influent în lumea vestică. Este o religie unică printre religiile lumii, deși are multe în comun cu hinduismul, prin faptul că ambele învață karma (etica cauză-efect), maya (natura iluzorie a lumii) și samsara (ciclul de reîncarnări). Budiștii cred că țelul cel mai înalt al vieții este să dobândească „iluminarea”, după cum o percep ei.

Fondatorul budismului, Siddhartha Guatama, s-a născut în familia regală din India în anul 600 î.Cr. După cum se povestește, a trăit în lux, având puțin contact cu lumea exterioară. Părinții săi au vrut ca el să fie ferit de influența religiei și protejat de durere și suferință. Totuși, nu după multă vreme, adăpostul său a fost penetrat, și a avut viziuni cu un om în vârstă, un bolnav și un cadavru. Cea de-a patra viziune a fost cu un călugăr ascetic liniștit (unul care respinge luxul și confortul). Văzând liniștea călugărului, a decis să devină și el ascet. A abandonat viața de bogăție și de prosperitate, pentru a urmări iluminarea, prin austeritate. Avea înclinație pentru automortificare și meditare intensă. A fost lider între colegii săi. În cele din urmă, eforturile lui au culminat cu un gest final. S-a „răsfățat” cu un bol de orez și apoi s-a așezat sub un smochin (numit și copacul bodhi), pentru a medita până fie va dobândi „iluminarea”, fie va muri în încercarea sa. În ciuda chinului și a tentațiilor, în dimineața următoare, dobândise iluminarea. Astfel a ajuns cunoscut ca „cel luminat”, sau „Buddha”. În lumina noii lui realizări, a început să-i învețe pe colegii lui călugări, între care dobândise deja o mare influență. Cinci dintre colegii săi au devenit primii săi ucenici.

Ce descoperise Gautama? Iluminarea se află pe „calea de mijloc”, nu în răsfăț de lux sau în automortificare. Mai mult, el a descoperit ceea ce urma să ajungă cunoscut ca „Cele patru adevăruri nobile” – 1) a trăi înseamnă să suferi (dukkha), 2) suferința este cauzată de dorință (tanha, sau „atașament”), 3) suferința poate fi eliminată prin eliminarea tuturor atașamentelor și 4) acest lucru este dobândit urmând calea nobilă cu opt brațe. „Calea cu opt brațe” constă din a avea 1) o vedere, 2) o intenție, 3) o vorbire, 4) o acțiune, 5) un trai (viața de călugăr), 6) un efort (energii corect direcționate), 7) o înțelegere (meditare) și 8) o concentrare (focalizare) corectă. Învățăturile lui Buddha au fost strânse în tripitaka, sau „trei coșuri”.

În spatele acestor învățături distinctive sunt învățăturile comune și hinduismului, și anume reîncarnarea, karma, maya și o tendință de a înțelege realitatea ca fiind panteistă în orientarea ei. Budismul oferă de asemenea o teologie elaborată a zeităților și a ființelor înălțate. Totuși, asemenea hinduismului, budismul poate fi greu de definit în ceea ce privește felul în care Îl vede pe Dumnezeu. Unele curente de budism ar putea fi numite în mod legitim ateiste, în timp ce altele ar putea fi numite panteiste, iar altele teiste, cum este Budismul Țării Pure. Totuși, budismul clasic tinde să păstreze tăcerea cu privire la realitatea unei ființe supreme și, prin urmare, este considerat ateist.

Budismul de astăzi este foarte divers. Este, în mare, divizibil în două categorii vaste: Theravada (vas mic) și Mahayana (vas mare). Theravada este forma de călugărie care rezervă cea mai înaltă iluminare și nirvana pentru călugări, în timp ce budismul Mahayana extinde acest țel al iluminării și pentru laici, adică pentru cei care nu sunt călugări. În cadrul acestor categorii pot fi găsite numeroase ramuri, printre care Tendai, Vajrayana, Nichiren, Shingon, Țara Pură, Zen și Ryobu. Prin urmare, este important ca cei din afară care caută să înțeleagă budismul să nu presupună că știu toate detaliile unei anumite școli budiste, când tot ceea ce au studiat este budismul clasic, istoric.

Buddha nu s-a considerat niciodată pe sine dumnezeu sau vreun fel de ființă divină. Mai degrabă s-a considerat un „arătător de cale” pentru alții. Numai după moartea sa a fost ridicat la rang de dumnezeu de către unii dintre urmașii săi, deși nu toți urmașii săi l-au văzut în acest fel. Totuși, în ceea ce privește creștinismul, în Biblie se afirmă în mod clar că Isus a fost Fiul lui Dumnezeu (Matei 3.17: „Și din ceruri s-a auzit un glas care zicea: «Acesta este Fiul Meu preaiubit, în care Îmi găsesc plăcerea»”) și că El și Dumnezeu sunt una (Ioan 10.30). Nimeni nu se poate numi pe sine creștin, dacă nu mărturisește credința în Isus ca Dumnezeu.

Isus i-a învățat pe oameni că El este calea, nu doar unul care arată calea, după cum confirmă Ioan 14.6: „Eu sunt Calea, Adevărul și Viața. Nimeni nu vine la Tatăl decât prin Mine.” La vremea la care Guatama a murit, budismul devenise o influență majoră în India; trei sute de ani mai târziu, budismul cuprinsese majoritatea Asiei. Textele sacre și cuvintele atribuite lui Buddha au fost scrise la aproximativ patru sute de ani după moartea sa.

În budism, păcatul este în mare parte înțeles ca fiind ignoranță. Și, în vreme ce păcatul este înțeles ca „greșeală morală”, contextul în care sunt înțelese „binele” și „răul” este amoral. Karma este înțeleasă ca fiind echilibrul naturii și nu este pusă în aplicare în mod personal. Natura nu este morală; prin urmare, karma nu este un cod moral și păcatul nu este în esență imoral. Astfel, putem spune, folosind gândirea budistă, că greșeala noastră nu este o problemă morală, devreme ce, în cele din urmă, este o greșeală impersonală, nu o infracțiune interpersonală. Consecința acestei înțelegeri este devastatoare. Pentru budiști, păcatul este mai degrabă un pas greșit decât o ofensă adusă naturii Dumnezeului sfânt. Această înțelegere a păcatului nu este în acord cu conștiența morală înnăscută că oamenii sunt condamnați, datorită păcatului lor, în fața unui Dumnezeu sfânt (Romani 1-2).

Devreme ce susține că păcatul este o eroare impersonală și reparabilă, budismul nu este de acord cu doctrina depravării, o doctrină de bază a creștinismului. Biblia ne spune că păcatul omului este o problemă cu consecință eternă și infinită. În budism nu este nevoie de un mântuitor care să salveze oamenii de la păcatele care îi condamnă. Pentru creștin, Isus este singura cale de scăpare de la condamnarea eternă. Pentru budiști există doar trăire etică și apeluri în meditație către ființele înălțate, în speranța că, poate, vor dobândi iluminarea și, în final, nirvana. Mai mult ca sigur, vor trebui să treacă printr-un număr de reîncarnări, pentru a plăti imensa acumulare de datorie karmică. Pentru adevărații urmași ai budismului, religia este o filosofie a moralității și a eticii, cuprinsă într-o viață de renunțare la sine. În budism, realitatea este impersonală și nonrelațională; prin urmare, nu este iubitoare. Nu doar că Dumnezeu este văzut ca fiind iluzoriu, ci, socotind păcatul ca o greșeală amorală și respingând toată realitatea materială ca fiind maya („iluzie”), chiar noi înșine ne pierdem „sinele”. Însăși personalitatea devine o iluzie.

Când a fost întrebat cum a început lumea, cine a creat Universul, Buddha se spune că a păstrat tăcerea, pentru că în budism nu există început și sfârșit. În schimb, există un ciclu nesfârșit al nașterii și al morții. Ar trebui să ne întrebăm ce fel de Ființă ne-a creat ca să trăim, să îndurăm atât de multă durere și suferință și apoi să murim din nou și din nou? Ar trebui ca acest lucru să trezească un semn de întrebare asupra rostului unor astfel de lucruri. Creștinii știu că Dumnezeu Și-a trimis Fiul să moară pentru noi, o singură dată, ca să nu trebuiască să suferim noi o veșnicie întreagă. El Și-a trimis Fiul ca să ne dea cunoștința faptului că nu suntem singuri și că suntem iubiți. Creștinii știu că viața înseamnă mai mult decât suferința și moartea: „...dar care a fost descoperit acum prin arătarea Mântuitorului nostru Cristos Isus, care a nimicit moartea și a adus la lumină viața și neputrezirea, prin Evanghelie” (2 Timotei 1.10).

Budismul învață că nirvana este cea mai înaltă stare de existență, o stare de existență pură, și că este dobândită prin mijloace care țin de fiecare individ. Nirvana sfidează explicația rațională și ordonarea logică și, prin urmare, nu poate fi predată, ci numai realizată. În contrast cu aceasta, învățătura lui Isus cu privire la cer este foarte specifică. El ne-a învățat că trupurile noastre fizice mor, dar că sufletele noastre se înalță, ca să fie în cer, împreună cu El (Marcu 12.25). Buddha i-a învățat pe alții că oamenii nu au suflete individuale, pentru că sinele sau eul este o iluzie. Pentru budiști, nu există niciun Tată ceresc iubitor, care Și-a trimis Fiul să moară pentru sufletele noastre, pentru mântuirea noastră, pentru a ne deschide o cale prin care să ajungem în gloria Lui. În esență, iată de ce budismul trebuie respins.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Vechi 17.04.2015, 23:02:24
florin.oltean75's Avatar
florin.oltean75 florin.oltean75 is offline
Senior Member
 
Data înregistrării: 23.03.2011
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 2.935
Implicit

Cristi, (de ce "stooge"?)

Pasajul propus spre citire este aceeasi mostra de principii alterate atribuite budismului, cu grave erori de interpretare.

In acest gen de texte (analize comparative budism-crestinism) pare sa fie o vadita inclinatie spre distorsionarea sensurilor, evident in scop propagandistic.

Cautarea sincera a sensurilor este exclusa atunci cand doresti sa combati o anumita perspectiva de gandire.

Ochiul cauta defectul nu adevarul.

-----

De exemplu, budismul nu considera dorinta ca fiind ceva negativ,
ci prin "tanha" se intelege patima, compulsiunea.

Dar este mai usor sa sugerezi ca budismul este o religie care mutileaza aspiratia si afectul, ca "zombifica" - si atunci care este oare calea corecta?

O minte de inteligenta medie poate sesiza cu usurinta acest tip de tehnica manipulativa.

In budism sunt o multitudine de rationamente menite sa cultive, sa amplifice dorintele/aspiratiile virtuoase odata cu bucuriile profunde asociate acestora.

Insa acest tezaur ramane inchis atunci cand pe usa de la intrare se pune un stigmat.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #6  
Vechi 17.04.2015, 23:44:40
AlinB AlinB is offline
Senior Member
 
Data înregistrării: 29.01.2007
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 20.197
Implicit

Taáč‡hā (Pāli; Sanskrit: táč›áčŁáč‡Ä, also trishna) is a Buddhist term that literally means "thirst," and is commonly translated as craving or desire.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ta%E1%B9%87h%C4%81

Pai scrie-le nene la astia de la Wikipedia ca s-au inselat si doar tu esti cunoscator adevarat al budhismului.

Ca nu se mentioneaza si de "chanda" in articol nu cred ca are prea mare importanta.

Mai bine leaga-te de restul aspectelor ca sunt mult mai importante.

La fel de bine ti se poate reprosa ca tu fiind atasat sentimental de o idee, care este opusul ratiunii, nu poti analiza obiectiv un articol critic.

Ca in afara de o obiectie f. relativa de care te-ai agatat ca inecatul de pai, nu ai venit cu nici o critica argumentata punctual.
__________________
Suprema intelepciune este a distinge binele de rau.

Last edited by AlinB; 17.04.2015 at 23:51:55.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Vechi 17.04.2015, 23:52:17
stoogecristi stoogecristi is offline
Banned
 
Data înregistrării: 15.04.2015
Locație: Bucuresti
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 52
Implicit

Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism
(from Encyclopedia of Cults and New Religions, Harvest House, 1999)

Info at a Glance
Name: Buddhism (B); Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism or Nichiren Shoshu of America (NS).

Purpose: (B) To eradicate suffering and attain enlightenment; (NS) to receive material benefits and find happiness.

Founder: (B) Gautama Siddhartha (ca. 563-483 B.C.); (NS) Nichiren Daishonin (1222-1282 A.D.)

Source of authority: (B) The Pali canon and other Buddhist Scripture, personal experience; (NS) The Lotus Sutra and Nichiren Daishonin’s writings (Gosho), personal experience.

Claim: (B) Through the Buddha’s teachings, one can attain true enlightenment and find contentment; (NS) to represent the only true Buddhism.

Revealed teachings: (B) No (early Buddhism), Yes (later Buddhism); (NS) Yes

Theology: (B) Nontheistic or atheistic (early Buddhism), polytheistic (later Buddhism); (NS) polytheistic.

Occult dynamics: (B & NS) Altered states of consciousness, ritual, psychic powers, spiritism.

Key literature: (B) The Pali Canon, various other scriptures; (NS) The Lotus Sutra, the writings of Nichiren Daishonin, Daisku Ikeda and principal periodicals: The Seikyo Times, The World Tribune NSA Quarterly (defunct).

Attitude toward Christianity: Rejecting.

Note: In America today, there are an estimated 1,000 plus Buddhist centers and millions of practicing Buddhists. “Later,” or Mahayana Buddhism, is predominate in the West, and this includes Zen, Tibetan/Tantric and Nichiren schools of Buddhism.

DOCTRINAL SUMMARY

God: Ultimate reality is a condition of “existence” called nirvana; no supreme God exists. In NS, the equivalent is an impersonal life essence “incarnated” in the Lotus Sutra and Ghonzon.

Jesus: A wise sage (perhaps enlightened), whose teachings were distorted by Christian myths.

Salvation: Through occult meditation and ritual to attain enlightenment or true understand*ing of and control over “reality.”

Man: In his true essence and enlightenment, one with the Buddha.

Sin: Ignorance.

Satan: An impersonal force within Nature, personification of “evil.”

Bible: Generally, a scripture containing true and false teachings.

Death: Reincarnation into nirvana.

Heaven and Hell: Temporary states of mind or places.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Vechi 17.04.2015, 23:59:42
stoogecristi stoogecristi is offline
Banned
 
Data înregistrării: 15.04.2015
Locație: Bucuresti
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 52
Implicit Buddhism vs. Christianity

In an era pregnant with tolerance for everything, some Christians have embraced Bud*dhism while numerous attempts have been made to “unify” Buddhism and Christianity by ecumenically minded members of both faiths. Friendly Buddhist and Christian encounters are the vogue on some university campuses. Through no fault of its own, however, “Chris*tianity” is frequently the loser in such encounters. Thus, mainline Christians, who have no real comprehension of biblical Christianity but are fascinated by the alluring or mystical nature of Buddhist metaphysics, may leave their “faith” and become Buddhists. Or, they may maintain a rather odd mixture of both religions, one that is ultimately unfaithful to both. On the other hand, Buddhists who “accept” Christianity merely redefine it into their own Buddhism. Professor of Buddhism and Japanese Studies at Tokyo and Harvard Universi*ties respectively, Masaharu Anesaki illustrates this by his assimilation of Jesus with the Buddha:

In short, we Buddhists are ready to accept Christianity; nay, more, our faith in Buddha is faith in Christ. We see Christ because we see Buddha.... We can hope not in vain for the second advent of Christ [that is] the appearance of the [prophesied] future Buddha Metteya. [1] (italics in original)
Nevertheless, rather than seeking a “unity” among these religions, the truth is much closer to the gut feeling of Zen Buddhist D.T. Suzuki, who states, as he undoubtedly re*flects upon the Buddhist concept of suffering: “Whenever I see a crucified figure of Christ, I cannot help thinking of the gap that lies deep between Christianity and Buddhism.” [2]

The truth is that purported similarities between Buddhism and Christianity are only apparent or surface. For example, many have claimed a similarity between Jesus Christ’s saving role in Christianity and the Bodhisattva’s savior role as given in later Buddhism. But these roles are entirely contradictory. In Christianity, “Christ died for our sins” (1 Cor. 15:3). This means He saves us from the penalty of our sins by taking God’s judgment of sin in His own Person. Jesus paid the penalty of sin (death) for sinners by dying in their place. Thus, He offers a free gift of salvation to anyone simply for believing and accepting what He has done on their behalf (Jn. 3:16). The central ideas involved in Christ’s saving role—God’s holiness, propitiatory atonement, forgiveness of sin, salvation as a free gift of God’s grace through faith in Christ, etc., are all foreign to Buddhism.

The Bodhisattva’s role of savior is thus entirely different than that of Christ’s. The Bodhisattva has no concern with sin in an ultimate sense, only with the end of suffering. He has no concept of God’s wrath against sin or the need for a propitiatory atonement. He has no belief in an infinite personal God who created men and women in His image. He has no belief in a loving God who freely forgives sinners. His only sacrifice is his postponement of entering nirvana so that he can help others find Buddhist enlightenment. Having achieved self-perfection, the Bodhisattva could freely enter nirvana at death. Instead, he chooses to reincarnate again to help others attain their own self-perfection and nirvana more quickly.

Thus, those who argue there is an essential similarity between Buddhist and Christian concepts of savior are wrong. In fact, at their core, Buddhism and Christianity are irreconcil*able, as far removed as the East and West. Indeed, virtually every major Christian doctrine is denied in Buddhism and vice versa. We would therefore suggest that a merging of the two traditions results in a disservice to both.

For their part, Buddhists have long recognized the differences between the two faiths. The knowledgeable Buddhist is aware that the doctrines and teachings of bibli*cal Christianity are an enemy rather than a friend, for Christian faith openly teaches those things which Buddhists reject as mere ignorance and/or as spiritual hindrances; further Christianity openly opposes those things which Buddhism endorses an essential for genuine enlightenment.

For example, Christianity is interwoven with the monotheistic grandeur of an infinite, personal God (Jn. 17:3; Isa. 43:10-11, 44:6); Buddhism is agnostic and practically speak*ing, atheistic (or in later form, polytheistic).

In Christianity, its central teaching involves the absolute necessity for belief in Jesus Christ as personal Savior from sin (Jn. 14:6; Acts 4:12; I Tim. 2:5-6); Buddhism has no Savior from sin and even in the Mahayana tradition, as we have seen, the savior concepts are quite dissimilar.

Christianity stresses salvation by grace through faith alone (Jn. 3:16; Eph. 2:8-9); Bud*dhism stresses enlightenment by works through meditative practices that seek the allevia*tion of “ignorance” and desire.

Christianity promises forgiveness of all sin now (Col. 2:13; Eph. 1:7) and the eventual elimination of sin and suffering for all eternity (Rev. 21:3-4). On the other hand, Buddhism, since it holds there is no God to offend, promises not the forgiveness and eradication of sin, but rather the elimination of suffering (eventually) and the ultimate eradication of the individual.

Wherever we look philosophically, we see the contrasts between these faiths. Christian*ity stresses salvation from sin, not from life itself (1 Jn. 2:2). Christianity exalts personal existence as innately good, since man was created in God’s image, and promises eternal life and fellowship with a personal God (Gen. 1:26, 31; Rev. 21:3-4). Christianity has a distinctly defined teaching in the afterlife (heaven or hell, e.g., Mt. 25:46; Rev. 20:10-15). It promises eternal immortality for man as man—but perfected in every way (Rev. 21:3-4).
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Vechi 18.04.2015, 00:02:37
stoogecristi stoogecristi is offline
Banned
 
Data înregistrării: 15.04.2015
Locație: Bucuresti
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 52
Implicit

On the other hand, Buddhism teaches reincarnation, and has only a mercurial nirvana wherein man no longer remains man or, where, in Mahayana, there exists temporary heav*ens or hells and the final “deification” of “man” through a merging with the ultimate panthe*istic-cosmic Buddha nature. But Christianity denies that reincarnation is a valid belief, based on the fact of Christ’s propitiatory atonement for sin. In other words, if Christ died to forgive all sin, there is no reason for a person to pay the penalty for their own sin (“karma”) over many lifetimes (Col. 2:13; Heb. 9:27; 10:10, 14; Eph. 1:7).

Consider further contrasts. Biblical Christianity rejects pagan mysticism and all occult*ism (e.g., Deut. 18:9-12); Buddhism accepts or actively endorses them.

In Christianity life itself is good and given honor and meaning; in Buddhism one finds it difficult to deny that life is ultimately not worth living—for life and suffering are inseparable. Thus, in Christianity, Jesus Christ came that men “might have life and have it more abun*dantly” (Jn. 10:10); in Buddhism, Buddha came that men might simply rid themselves of personal existence.

In Christianity, God will either glorify or punish the spirit of man (Jn. 5:28-29); in Bud*dhism no spirit exists to be glorified or punished. In Christianity, absolute morality is a central theme (Eph. 1:4), in Buddhism it is secondary or peripheral.

Buddhism is essentially humanistic, stressing man’s self-achievement. Christianity is essentially theistic, stressing God’s self-revelation and gracious initiative on behalf of man’s helpless moral and spiritual condition. Thus, in Buddhism man alone is the author of salva*tion; Christianity sees this as an absolute impossibility because innately, man has no power to save himself (Eph. 2:8-9; Titus 3:5).

We could go on, but suffice it to say the form of romantic humanism that inspires liberal religionists to see basic similarities in the two faiths is no more than wishful thinking. It is not utterly surprising, however, that Western religious humanists would promote Buddhism, for in both systems man is the measure of all things (a god of sorts), even if in the latter the end result is a form of personal self-annihilation. But to the extent both are humanistic, they compass the antithesis of Christianity, whose goal is to glorify God and not man (Jer. 17:5; Jude 24-25).

As far as knowing and glorifying God is concerned, this is unimportant and irrelevant to Buddhists. But biblically, to the extent God is ignored or opposed, to that extent man must correspondingly suffer. Here we see the ultimate irony of Buddhism: in ignoring God, Bud*dhists feel they can escape suffering; in fact this will only perpetuate it forever. This is the real tragedy of Buddhism, especially of so-called Christian Buddhism. The very means to escape suffering (true faith in the biblical Christ) is rejected in favor of a self-salvation which can only result in eternal suffering (Mt. 25:46; Rev. 20:10-15).


NOTES
 Masaharu Anesaki, “How Christianity Appeals to a Japanese Buddhist,” in David W. McKain (ed.), Christianity: Some Non-Christian Appraisals, (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1976), pp. 102-103.
 D.T. Suzuki, “Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist,” in McKain (ed.), p. 111.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Vechi 18.04.2015, 00:03:53
florin.oltean75's Avatar
florin.oltean75 florin.oltean75 is offline
Senior Member
 
Data înregistrării: 23.03.2011
Religia: Ortodox
Mesaje: 2.935
Implicit

Citat:
În prealabil postat de AlinB Vezi mesajul
Taáč‡hā (Pāli; Sanskrit: táč›áčŁáč‡Ä, also trishna) is a Buddhist term that literally means "thirst," and is commonly translated as craving or desire.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ta%E1%B9%87h%C4%81

Pai scrie-le nene la astia de la Wikipedia ca s-au inselat si doar tu esti cunoscator adevarat al budhismului.
Ma bucur ca ai facut efortul sa verifici.

Apreciez ca este un progres sensibil din partea ta.

Oare ce cuvant alegem pentru a traduce tanha - intre "craving" (poftire ) si "desire" (a dori) cand vrem sa combatem budismul?

In engleza "desire" este mult mai apropiat ca sens de "craving" (pofta).

In romaneste legatura semantica dintre "dorinta" si "pofta" nu este asa de stransa.

In romaneste " dorinta" este evident legata fonetic de "dor" - sugerand mai mult o extensie afectiva nu o patima.

Deci este mai mult o problema de evocare a sensurilor in limba romana decat o problema in engleza.

Asa ca cei de la wikipedia nu gresesc cand spun "craving".

Dar textele care traduc intentionat cu "dorinta" - si isi construiesc pledoaria din aceasta perspectiva - pacatuiesc, cu voie sau fara de voie.

Alin, daca tu ai priceput, eu unul sunt multumit.

Domnul fie cu tine!
__________________

Reply With Quote
Răspunde

Thread Tools
Moduri de afișare